Sunday, February 2, 2014

Experimenting with Hyperthermia at Home

After having gone through whole body hyperthermia in Austria with a great success I wondered what I could do at home to keep high temperature treatments going to at least some extent. The question is how high in temperature can you get up a home without any professional equipment.

I purchased a small portable infrared sauna at home that I use now about once per week now (I should do it more often, i.e. 2x per week) to get my body temperature up on a periodic basis. I experimented a bit with length of use and rise of body temperature. After about 40 min sitting in the sauna running at maximum temperature I get up to about 38 deg C or 100 deg F in temperature (measured orally). That could corresponds to as high as 39 deg C or 102 deg F core temperature (measured rectally), although it is unlikely given how long it took me in Vienna to get to an increase of 1-2 degrees Celsius.

For me 40 min in the home sauna is about as good as it gets. I can't stay in there much longer, I just get too tired sitting and I want to lie down. So next I started to attend a commercial IR sauna where I could lie down.  I was able to stay in there for about 2 hours. After that I started to crash. I stayed in the sauna for 2 hours, then drove straight home (trying to stay warm) and then went immediately for 3/4 of an hour or so into the hot bathtub, as hot as I can tolerate. That approach would split the heating time between bath and sauna.

In general it seems that exposure to hot water is more draining to the body than heat provided via light or photons, even infrared light.  I have noticed how fatigued I get when sitting  in a super hot tub for long periods of time. After a while you can barely get out anymore. But at least in the tub it is possible to lie down and was at home, close to getting to bed.  The combination of those two procedures seemed effective.


After the IR sauna and bathtub combo I wrapped myself up into a cotton sheet and an emergency blanket sleeping bag made of thin metal foil. Then I lied down, covered myself up with a thick blankets and lied there heated in bed for a few hours. Of course plenty of fluids though during all this. I typically make myself a mix with electrolytes, Vitamin C and grapefruit seed extract (for Lyme cysts and biofilm). I have not measured how high the temperature actually got up to during the IR sauna/bathtub combination, but it felt pretty strong and I was sweating quite a bit

There are now a many larger commercial infrared saunas available in gyms and spas that are lie down style and are more suitable for longer sessions. See the resources section under hyperthermia for more info.

Another good option would be to do a Bikram Yoga session combined with a hot bath at home. However, one needs to be in bit of shape to make it through 1 hour Bikram, an not every Lyme patient can do that.



1 comment:

Kelsey Bell said...

Hi! I was on your blog learning about treatments and am wondering if I should just go straight to Austria/Germany. I've had Lyme since 2012 and was finally bedridden this summer. Starting penicillin injections now but I'm wondering if that will be enough and am sick of waiting to get better after 3 years... Do you think you could have skipped the Antibiotics and gone straight to the clinic and had the same results?